How Well Do You Let Go and Move On?

This is part 2 of my “Letting Go” series. If you missed Part 1 “When your buttons get pushed how well you you manage?” you can find it here

Whether you’re letting go of a cherished idea or person or a vision of how life was supposed to be, it can feel excruciating to leave something or someone behind. It can feel as though you’re losing a part of yourself.

Sometimes you might even feel attached to your anger and resentment. But letting go can be an empowering act, because it pushes you to develop important resources like courage, compassion, forgiveness and love.

Answer the following true/false questions to discover how well you release what’s no longer viable:

Set 1

1. I have a hard time letting go of grudges. When someone does me wrong, they are permanently on my “bad” list.

2. I somehow feel it’s “noble” to never give up, and this has caused me to stay in unhealthy relationships or situations.

3. When an intimate relationship ends, it can take me years to get over it.

4. I spend a lot of time living in the past—sometimes reliving old glory days, sometimes replaying what I wish I’d done differently.

5. When I make a mistake, I can’t stop dwelling on it and kicking myself.

6. I feel paralyzed by my fear of the unknown. I can’t let go of what I have when I don’t know what will replace it.

Set 2

1. When negative emotions arise, I allow myself to fully experience all my feelings, and I quickly find myself in a better emotional state.

2. Leaving behind a situation that isn’t working for me is the most self-caring thing I can do.

3. Finding a way to forgive someone—and sometimes myself—allows me to release anger and blame.

4. When I’m in conflict with someone, sharing my feelings allows me to feel heard, release my negative feelings and return to a place of peace and connection.

5. Although keeping the status quo may feel safer, I am committed to making choices that help me get out of my comfort zone and grow.

6. When dealing with the grieving process around the death of a loved one or the end of a relationship, ultimately finding a way to accept what IS, even though still sad, brings me greater peace.

How did you do?  This isn’t to judge yourself, only to observe so you can put words to your feelings, validate those emotions and move on. If you answered true to any in Set 1 and could use some support I’d love to have you join my Group Call on the topic of Forgiveness on April 19th @ 1pm MT. Sometimes finding peace is simply a matter of be willing to forgive ourselves and others.

Author’s content used under license, © Claire Communications

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